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Fair Employment Monitoring Report

Latest edition
MonitoringReport26

What you need to know

Monitoring report

What is FE monitoring?

Companies data

 

Monitoring Northern Ireland's Workforce - High level trends over time


Although the central purpose of employer monitoring information is to allow employers (through their Article 55 reviews) to determine whether members of each community are afforded fair participation in those individual employments, there is also interest in considering monitoring figures at the Northern Ireland level.

The Commission’s annual ‘Fair Employment Monitoring report’ has for more than two decades aggregated monitoring information across all monitored employers in Northern Ireland, to produce composition figures (employees, applicants, appointees, promotees, leavers) at the Northern Ireland level and for key sectors.

By doing so, the Monitoring Report: An overview of high level trends and aggregated monitoring returns (pdf, 1.8mb) seeks to inform employers and interested parties about aggregate compositional patterns that, alongside other information on local labour availability, might suggest a dynamic or pattern that might better inform their own considerations of fair participation within their own or specific employment(s).
 

 

Key findings

Employment Stocks:
 

  • The composition of all monitored employments, when aggregated together, now more closely mirrors estimates of the composition of all those available for work than when fair employment monitoring was first introduced.
  • While members of the Protestant community continue to comprise the majority of the monitored workforce, the Roman Catholic community continued to increase (by around [0.5 pp] per annum) to [47.9%] in 2015. A gradual upward trend (averaging around [0.6 pp] per annum) in the Roman Catholic community share of the monitored workforce has been observed since 2001.


Employment Flows:
 

  • For a seventh consecutive year, the Roman Catholic community [52.9%] comprised a greater proportion of applicants than the Protestant community [47.1%] continuing the gradual increase observed in their share over the period 2001-2015.
  • In every year since 2006, members of the Roman Catholic community [53.1%] comprised a greater proportion of appointees than did the Protestant community [46.9%].  In 2015, the Roman Catholic community share increased by [1.3 pp] suggesting that the slight decrease in the Roman Catholic community share in 2014 was temporary and marks a continuation of the overall trend of increased Roman Catholic appointees to the monitored workforce of [8.1 pp] from [44.8%] in 2001.
  • Members of the Roman Catholic community comprised [50.9%] of leavers from the monitored workforce. Members of the Protestant community comprised [49.1%] of leavers. Overall, the share of leavers from the Protestant community has decreased by [6.7 pp] from [55.8%] in 2001.

See our latest Monitoring Report No.26 >


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Monitoring Northern Ireland's Workforce


This, the 26th Annual Monitoring Report (pdf, 1.8mb), presents an aggregated summary of the 3,691 valid monitoring returns received during 2015 from 138 public authorities and 3,553 private sector concerns.  These returns were received between 1st January and 31st December 2015.

This year’s report shows the Protestant community share of the monitored workforce was [52.1%] and the Roman Catholic community share was [47.9%].

For ease of navigation the report is broken down into sections, with a short overview and links to additional tables and charts.

1. Monitored Northern Ireland Workforce

Employees

In 2015, while members of the Protestant community continued to comprise the majority of the workforce, the Roman Catholic community share [47.9%] continued to increase (by [0.5 pp]), at a slower rate than previously observed.

Profile of the Monitored Northern Ireland Workforce [%] by Community Background, 2015


Monitored NI Workforce - All Employees


Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • The Roman Catholic community continued to comprise more than half of applicants [52.9%] and appointees [53.1%].

  • Members of the Roman Catholic community comprised [50.9%] of leavers from the monitored workforce and members of the Protestant community comprised [49.1%] of leavers. Overall, the share of leavers from the Protestant community has decreased by [6.7 pp] from [55.8%] in 2001.
     

Find out more

For an analysis of the Northern Ireland workforce, see pages 9-12 of the Fair Employment Monitoring Report No.26 (pdf, 1.8mb)


Supplementary technical tables and charts for the Monitored Northern Ireland Workforce as a whole are available to download:
 

 

2. Private Sector

Private Sector Employees

In 2015, while the Protestant community continued to comprise the majority of the private sector workforce the Roman Catholic community share [47.6%] continued to increase, at a greater rate to that observed in recent years (by [0.6 pp] compared to an average of [0.5 pp] per annum).

Private Sector Workforce All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2001-2015

Private Sector - All Employees by Community Background
 

Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • The Roman Catholic community continued to comprise more than half of applicants [52.9%] and appointees [52.9%].
  • For the first time in the period 2001-2015, the Roman Catholic community share of private sector leavers increased by [1.9 pp] from [50.0%] to [51.9%].


Find out more

For an analysis of the Private Sector workforce, see pages 13-15 of Fair Employment Monitoring Report No.26 (pdf, 1.8mb)


Supplementary technical tables and charts for the Private Sector Monitored NI Workforce as a whole are available to download:
 

 

3. Public Sector

Public Sector Employees

In 2015, while members of the Protestant community [51.6%] continued to comprise the majority of the public sector workforce the Roman Catholic community [48.4%] share continued to increase.

Public Sector Workforce All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2001-2015

Public Sector Workforce - All Employees by Community Background
Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • For a fourth consecutive year, members of the Roman Catholic community [52.7%] comprised a greater share of applicants than that of members of Protestant community. The Roman Catholic community comprised more than half of all appointees [54.3%].

  • The Protestant community [51.3%] continued to comprise the majority of leavers from the private sector.
     

Find out more

For an analysis of the Public Sector workforce, see pages 16-19 of the Fair Employment Monitoring Report No.26 (pdf, 1.8mb)


Supplementary technical tables and charts for the Public Sector Monitored NI Workforce as a whole are available to download:
 

 

4. Health Sector

Health Sector Employees

In 2015, the Roman Catholic community share [51.9%] of health sector employment continued to increase, continuing the trend observed since 2011 of a greater share of members of the Roman Catholic community in the health sector.

Health Sector All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2001-2015

Health Sector - all employees by community background
 












 





Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • In 2015, the Roman Catholic community share of health sector applicants [58.1%] continued to increase, although at a greater rate than in previous years. The Roman Catholic community share of appointees [58.7%] increased in 2015, and overall has increased by [8.5 pp] from [50.2%] in 2001.

  • During the period 2008-2015, the shares of leavers from members of the Roman Catholic community and members of the Protestant community fluctuated, and thus no observable trend can be identified by community background.
     

Find out more

Supplementary technical tables and charts for the Health Sector Monitored Workforce (NI) as a whole are available to download:
 

 

5. Education Sector

Education Sector Employees

In 2015, the Roman Catholic and Protestant community shares of the education sector workforce were [50.2%] and [49.8%] respectively.

Education Sector All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2001-2015

Education sector - all employees by community background
 











 







Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • Members of the Roman Catholic community continued to account for a greater share of applicants [54.9%] and appointees [51.8%].
  • During the period 2008-2015 the Protestant and Roman Catholic community shares of leavers fluctuated.
     

Find out more

Supplementary technical tables and charts for the Education Sector Monitored Workforce (NI) as a whole are available to download:
 

 

6. District Councils

District Council Employees

In 2015, while members of the Protestant community [55.9%] continued to account for the majority share, the Roman Catholic community share continued to increase [44.1%].

District Councils All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2001-2015

Councils - all employees by community background


















Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • Members of the Protestant community continued to comprise the majority of applicants [53.6%]. For the third consecutive year, however, members of the Roman Catholic community comprised the majority of appointees [50.6%].
  • As with every year across the period from 2008, members of the Protestant community [55.4%] comprised a greater share of leavers from the monitored workforce.
     

Find out more

Supplementary technical tables and charts for the District Councils Monitored NI Workforce as a whole are available to download:
 

 

7. Civil Service

Civil Service Employees

In 2015, while members of the Protestant community [52.7%] continued to comprise the majority of the civil service workforce, the Roman Catholic community share continued to increase.

Civil Service All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2001-2015

Civil Service - all employees by community background
 















Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • After decreasing in 2013, the Roman Catholic community share of applicants increased for the second consecutive year to [54.5%] in 2015.
  • Similarly, the Roman Catholic community share of appointees [50.1%] increased for the second consecutive year.
  • As with every year across the period from 2008, members of the Protestant community [58.4%] comprised a greater share of leavers from the monitored workforce.

 

Find out more

Supplementary technical tables and charts for the Civil Service Monitored NI Workforce as a whole are available to download:
 

 

8. Security-related Sector

Security-related Sector Employees

In 2015, both the Protestant community share [74.4%] and the Roman Catholic community share [25.6%] of the security-related workforce remained unchanged from the previous year.

Security-related Sector All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2001-2015

Security sector - all employees by community background


 














Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • Members of the Protestant community continued to comprise the majority of security-related sector applicants [68.6%], appointees [80.3%] and leavers [79.5%].


Find out more

Supplementary technical tables and charts for the Security-related Sector Monitored NI Workforce as a whole are available to download:
 

 

9. 'Other' Public Authorities

'Other' Public Authority Employees

In 2015, members of the Protestant community [52.1%] continued to comprise the majority of the workforce, although the Roman Catholic community share [47.9%] has gradually increased during the period 2008-2015.


‘Other’ Public Authorities All Employees [%] by Community Background, 2008-2015

Other Public Authorities - all employees by community background
























Applicants, appointees, promotees and leavers

  • In 2015, the Roman Catholic community share [51.9%] accounted for the majority of applicants, marking a discontinuation of the broad trend of applicants being mainly from members of the Protestant community observed during the period 2008-2015.
  • For the third consecutive year, the Protestant community share [45.4%] of appointees decreased and members of the Roman Catholic community accounted for more than half [54.5%] of appointees
  • The Protestant community share [53.6%] of leavers decreased in 2015, and has decreased overall by [10.3 pp] from [63.9%] in 2001.

 

Find out more

Supplementary technical tables and charts for the 'Other' Public Authorities Monitored NI Workforce as a whole are available to download:
 

 
 

< NI Workforce - High Level Trends Over Time What is Fair Employment Monitoring? >

> Previous monitoring reports

2014 (Monitoring report No.25)


2013 (Monitoring report No.24)

 

 

2011 (Monitoring report No.22)

 

2009 (Monitoring report No.20)

 

2007 (Monitoring report No.18)


2005 (Monitoring report No. 16)


2003 (Monitoring report No.14)

 

2001 (Monitoring report No.12)

2012 (Monitoring report No.23)

2010 (Monitoring report No.21)


2008 (Monitoring report No.19)


2006 (Monitoring report No.17)


2004 (Monitoring report No.15)


2002 (Monitoring report No.13)









 


 

 
 

What is Fair Employment Monitoring?


The following downloads may be of help in assisting the reader in understanding the information presented in this report including the range of definitions and methodological points to be considered when interpreting the data, and in the wider concepts associated with fair employment.

What is 'Fair Employment' Monitoring?

Under Fair Employment legislation, employers in Northern Ireland must review their own workforce composition once every three years to assess ‘fair participation’ between the Protestant and Roman Catholic communities and where there is an under-representation, take appropriate affirmative action. 



To do this they are required to collect workforce monitoring information on an ongoing basis, and to use that information in their considerations.

Find out more:
 

 

What is the Fair Employment Monitoring Report?

A summary of the monitoring data collected by employers is also submitted to the Commission each year. The Commission has to date used this information to publish an Annual Summary of Fair Employment Monitoring Returns. 



The report provides an overview of high level patterns in the aggregate composition of monitored employment and in key sectors, public and private. It also provides details on key sub sectors and, via annexes, specific employers. The information, along with supporting technical tables is also available via this website.

Find out more:
 

 

FAQ: Key Definitions and concepts in Fair Employment

A consideration of fair employment relies on a number of key definitions and concepts, including:

  • the ‘community’ focus of monitoring and the meaning of terms such as fair participation; affirmative action; under-representation, catchment area and chill factor

  • those organisations subject to monitoring

  • the aspects of employment that are monitored (employees, applicants, promotees, leavers) and changes in the coverage of monitoring over time


Find out more:
 

 

The Fair Employment Treatment (Northern Ireland) Order 1998

The Fair Employment Treatment (Northern Ireland) Order 1998, prohibits employers from discriminating against or harassing job applicants and employees on the grounds of religious or similar philosophical belief or political opinion.

In addition to prohibiting discrimination, the Order imposes a number of extra duties on certain employers:

  • to register with the Equality Commission

  • to monitor the community background and sex of the workforce

  • to submit annual monitoring returns to ECNI

  • to conduct triennial reviews of the composition of the workforce and of employment practices (i.e. “Article 55 Reviews”)

  • to take affirmative action, where it is reasonable and appropriate to do so.


Find out more:
 

 
 



Additional information:

Trends in Community Proportions of Applications & Appointments to the Private & Public Sectors

Analysis of Fair Employment Monitoring Report Data 1991-2010
This paper considers key trends in applications and appointments (across all monitored employers in Northern Ireland) by community background over time.  Data is summed from that presented annually in the published monitoring reports to consider trends across the public and private sectors, and in key sub-areas of the public sector (for two discrete periods 1991-2000 and 2001-2012 in total; and also individual year-on-year data).

Although there are limitations in the data, the analysis indicates that community proportions of appointments approximate the community proportions of applications for each period, though with the total Protestant proportion of appointments lower than applications.  There are however some important differences overall and in year-on-year trends.

Find out more:
 

 

Community composition of the NI workforce as a whole

Community composition of the Northern Ireland workforce as a whole (including the non-monitored workkforce): An analysis of Labour Force Survey data (Dec 2010)
The Commission wished to improve knowledge and understanding of the community composition of the Northern Ireland workforce as a whole, including those sections of the workforce not covered by the FETO monitoring regulations.

An analysis of the Labour Force Survey (2001-2008) suggested that the estimated Protestant and Roman Catholic shares of the monitored workforce were similar (allowing for sampling error) to their respective shares of the non-monitored workforce.  Further, the estimated community compositions of the two largest sub-groupings (‘the self-employed’ and ‘employers with 10 or less employees’) broadly mirror the pattern observed in the non-monitored as a whole with the two smaller groupings (the Clergy and Teachers) having estimated community compositions further from the figure for the non-monitored workforce as a whole.

Find out more:
 

 
 
Companies data

Company data received from the valid monitoring returns received during 2015, from 103 public authorities and 2,310 private sector concerns which had 26 or more employees is available to download. There were 35 public authorities and 1,243 private sector concerns which had 25 or less employees, and these are not detailed here.

1. Composition of Individual Specified Authorities (26+ employees)

This deals with employees of the 103 public authorities and the community background of the total workforce in each concern, including part-time staff, from the 2015 monitoring returns:

 

2. Composition of Private Sector Concerns (26+ employees)

This deals with employees in those 2,310 private sector concerns with 26 or more employees. The community background of the total workforce in each concern, including part-time staff, from the 2015 monitoring returns:

 

3. Composition of Appointees to Individual Specified Authorities (26+ employees)

This lists the composition of appointees to those 103 public bodies with 26 or more employees. The total number of appointees to each body is given from the 2015 monitoring returns:
 

 

4. Composition of Appointees to Private Sector Concerns (251+ employees)

This provides information on appointees to the private sector in the same format that was used for the public sector in Section 3:
 

 

5. Interpretation of Company Data

The Commission recommends that care should be exercised in the interpretation of the information contained in relation to companies. In particular, composition does not have to reflect the overall composition of both communities at the NI level.
 

 
 


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